How To Maintain Healthy Teeth Through Dental Care

Filed Under (Dentistry) by on 23-04-2017

How To Maintain Healthy Teeth Through Dental Care

by

Krunal Dave

If you are having a hard time brushing your teeth efficiently, you should consider getting an electric toothbrush. These devices are very efficient and will allow you to clean your teeth thoroughly without having to brush vigorously. This is your best option if you have arthritis or if your children do not brush their teeth properly.

Regularly replace your toothbrush when it gets worn out. Using a worn out toothbrush can redistributes old bacteria back in your mouth. It can also harm gums and teeth since its bristles are harder and spread out. It is recommended that you replace your toothbrush every three to four months.

Practice flossing with your eyes closed shut. It can take days or even weeks to master this, and there is no real need to rush. The advantage is that once you master this, you can floss anytime and anywhere. Flossing could be something you can do without a mirror, on the road or in the office.

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Be realistic about your expectations for whitening toothpastes. The compounds and abrasives they contain are often very helpful at lightening the surface stains on your teeth, such as coffee stains. However, they are not going to address more serious issues like decay or stains that have penetrated the tooth enamel. Most dental experts agree that it is safe to use such toothpastes twice a day.

If you notice that you are getting a lot of cavities, it may be time to change what you are drinking. Carbonated soft drinks break down the enamel on your teeth and should be avoided to help protect your dental health. If you must drink a carbonated soft drink, immediately brush your teeth after drinking a serving.

Get your child a brightly colored toothbrush with a favorite cartoon character on it. This will encourage your children to brush teeth nightly. You should also hang up a colorful chart by the bathroom sink with your children\’s names on it and spaces to check off every time they brush.

Don\’t use a hard toothbrush when brushing your teeth. Soft and medium brushes are gentle on the teeth, ensuring your enamel stays securely in place. Hard bristles can cause problems that lead to cavities, decay and breakage. It\’s best to ask your dentist which brush brand he recommends when you visit.

Saliva plays an important part in keeping your mouth clean. If your mouth always feel dry, you need to hydrate more regularly and use antibacterial rinses to make up for the lack of saliva. If you take any medication, look up a list of side effects to find out if your medication could be causing your mouth to be dry.

Govan Dental Care

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ArticleRich.com

Petition pressures City of Edinburgh Council to review clause affecting live music scene

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 23-04-2017

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Live music venues in Edinburgh, Scotland are awaiting a review later this year on the 2005 licensing policy, which places limitations on the volume of amplified music in the city. Investigating into how the policy is affecting the Edinburgh music scene, a group of Wikinews writers interviewed venue owners, academics, the City of Edinburgh Council, and local band The Mean Reds to get different perspectives on the issue.

Since the clause was introduced by the government of the city of Edinburgh, licensed venues have been prohibited from allowing music to be amplified to the extent it is audible to nearby residential properties. This has affected the live music scene, with several venues discontinuing regular events such as open mic nights, and hosting bands and artists.

Currently, the licensing policy allows licensing standards officers to order a venue to cease live music on any particular night, based on a single noise complaint from the public. The volume is not electronically measured to determine if it breaches a decibel volume level. Over roughly the past year there have been 56 separate noise complaints made against 18 venues throughout the city.

A petition to amend the clause has garnered over 3,000 signatures, including the support of bar owners, musicians, and members of the general public.

On November 17, 2014, the government’s Culture and Sport Committee hosted an open forum meeting at Usher Hall. Musicians, venue owners and industry professionals were encouraged to provide their thoughts on how the council could improve live music in the city. Ways to promote live music as a key cultural aspect of Edinburgh were discussed and it was suggested that it could be beneficial to try and replicate the management system of live music of other global cities renowned for their live music scenes. However, the suggestion which prevailed above all others was simply to review the existing licensing policy.

Councillor (Cllr) Norma Austin-Hart, Vice Convenor of the Culture and Sport Committee, is responsible for the working group Music is Audible. The group is comprised of local music professionals, and councillors and officials from Edinburgh Council. A document circulated to the Music is Audible group stated the council aims “to achieve a balance between protecting residents and supporting venues”.

Following standard procedure, when a complaint is made, a Licensing Standards Officer (LSO) is dispatched to investigate the venue and evaluate the level of noise. If deemed to be too loud, the LSO asks the venue to lower the noise level. According to a document provided by the City of Edinburgh Council, “not one single business has lost its license or been closed down because of a breach to the noise condition in Edinburgh.”

In the Scotland Licensing Policy (2005), Clause 6.2 states, “where the operating plan indicates that music is to be played in a premises, the board will consider the imposition of a condition requiring amplified music from those premises to be inaudible in residential property.” According to Cllr Austin-Hart, the high volume of tenement housing in the city centre makes it difficult for music to be inaudible.

During the Edinburgh Festival Fringe during the summer, venues are given temporary licences that allow them to operate for the duration of the festival and under the condition that “all amplified music and vocals are controlled to the satisfaction of the Director of Services for Communities”, as stated in a document from the council. During the festival, there is an 11 p.m. noise restriction on amplified music, and noise may be measured by Environmental Health staff using sophisticated equipment. Noise is restricted to 65dB(A) from the facades of residential properties; however, complaints from residents still occur. In the document from the council, they note these conditions and limitations for temporary venues would not necessarily be appropriate for permanent licensed premises.

In a phone interview, Cllr Austin-Hart expressed her concern about the unsettlement in Edinburgh regarding live music. She referenced the closure of the well-known Picture House, a venue that has provided entertainment for over half a century, and the community’s opposition to commercial public bar chain Wetherspoon buying the venue. “[It] is a well-known pub that does not play any form of music”, Cllr Austin-Hart said. “[T]hey feel as if it is another blow to Edinburgh’s live music”. “[We] cannot stop Wetherspoon’s from buying this venue; we have no control over this.”

The venue has operated under different names, including the Caley Palais which hosted bands such as Queen and AC/DC. The Picture House opened in 2008.

One of the venues which has been significantly affected by the licensing laws is the Phoenix Bar, on Broughton Street. The bar’s owner, Sam Roberts, was induced to cease live music gigs in March, following a number of noise complaints against the venue. As a result, Ms Roberts was inspired to start the aforementioned petition to have Clause 6.2 of the licensing policy reviewed, in an effort to remove the ‘inaudibility’ statement that is affecting venues and the music scene.

“I think we not only encourage it, but actively support the Edinburgh music scene,” Ms Roberts says of the Phoenix Bar and other venues, “the problem is that it is a dying scene.”

When Ms Roberts purchased the venue in 2013, she continued the existing 30-year legacy established by the previous owners of hosting live acts. Representative of Edinburgh’s colourful music scene, a diverse range of genres have been hosted at the venue. Ms Roberts described the atmosphere when live music acts perform at her venue as “electric”. “The whole community comes together singing, dancing and having a party. Letting their hair down and forgetting their troubles. People go home happy after a brilliant night out. All the staff usually join in; the pub comes alive”. However licensing restrictions have seen a majority of the acts shut down due to noise complaints. “We have put on jazz, blues, rock, rockabilly, folk, celtic and pop live acts and have had to close everything down.” “Residents in Edinburgh unfortunately know that the Council policy gives them all the rights in the world, and the pubs and clubs none”, Ms Roberts clarified.

Discussing how inaudibility has affected venues and musicians alike, Ms Roberts stated many pubs have lost profit through the absence of gigs, and trying to soundproof their venue. “It has put many musicians out of work and it has had an enormous effect on earnings in the pub. […] Many clubs and bars have been forced to invest in thousands of pounds worth of soundproofing equipment which has nearly bankrupted them, only to find that even the tiniest bit of noise can still force a closure. It is a ridiculously one-sided situation.” Ms Roberts feels inaudibility is an unfair clause for venues. “I think it very clearly favours residents in Edinburgh and not business. […] Nothing is being done to support local business, and closing down all the live music venues in Edinburgh has hurt financially in so many ways. Not only do you lose money, you lose new faces, you lose the respect of the local musicians, and you begin to lose all hope in a ‘fair go’.”

With the petition holding a considerable number of signatures, Ms Roberts states she is still sceptical of any change occurring. “Over three thousand people have signed the petition and still the council is not moving. They have taken action on petitions with far fewer signatures.” Ms Roberts also added, “Right now I don’t think Edinburgh has much hope of positive change”.

Ms Roberts seems to have lost all hope for positive change in relation to Edinburgh’s music scene, and argues Glasgow is now the regional choice for live music and venues. “[E]veryone in the business knows they have to go to Glasgow for a decent scene. Glasgow City Council get behind their city.”

Ms Martina Cannon, member of local band The Mean Reds, said a regular ‘Open Mic Night’ she hosted at The Parlour on Duke Street has ceased after a number of complaints were made against the venue. “It was a shame because it had built up some momentum over the months it had been running”. She described financial loss to the venue from cancelling the event, as well as loss to her as organiser of the event.

Sneaky Pete’s music bar and club, owned by Nick Stewart, is described on its website as “open and busy every night”. “Many clubs could be defined as bars that host music, but we really are a music venue that serves drinks”, Mr Stewart says. He sees the live music scene as essential for maintaining nightlife in Edinburgh not only because of the economic benefit but more importantly because of the cultural significance. “Music is one of the important things in life. […] it’s emotionally and intellectually engaging, and it adds to the quality of life that people lead.”

Sneaky Pete’s has not been immune to the inaudibility clause. The business has spent about 20,000 pounds on multiple soundproofing fixes designed to quell complaints from neighboring residents. “The business suffered a great deal in between losing the option to do gigs for fear of complaints, and finishing the soundproofing. As I mentioned, we are a music business that serves drinks, not a bar that also has music, so when we lose shows, we lose a great deal of trade”, said Mr Stewart.

He believes there is a better way to go about handling complaints and fixing public nuisances. “The local mandatory condition requiring ‘amplified music and vocals’ to be ‘inaudible’ should be struck from all licenses. The requirement presupposes that nuisance is caused by music venues, when this may not reasonably be said to be the case. […] Nuisance is not defined in the Licensing Act nor is it defined in the Public Health Act (Scotland) 2008. However, The Consultation on Guidance to accompany the Statutory Nuisance Provisions of the Public Health etc (Scotland) Act 2008 states that ‘There are eight key issues to consider when evaluating whether a nuisance exists[…]'”.

The eight key factors are impact, locality, time, frequency, duration, convention, importance, and avoidability. Stewart believes it is these factors that should be taken into consideration by LSOs responding to complaints instead of the sole factor of “audibility”. He believes multiple steps should be taken before considering revocation of licenses. Firstly, LSOs should determine whether a venue is a nuisance based on the eight factors. Then, the venue should have the opportunity to comply by using methods such as changing the nature of their live performances (e.g. from hard rock to acoustic rock), changing their hours of operation, or soundproofing. If the venue still fails to comply, then a board can review their license with the goal of finding more ways to bring them into compliance as opposed to revoking their license.

Nick Stewart has discussed his proposal at length with Music is Audible and said he means to present his proposal to the City of Edinburgh Council.

Dr Adam Behr, a music academic and research associate at the University of Edinburgh who has conducted research on the cultural value of live music, says live music significantly contributes to the economic performance of cities. He said studies have shown revenue creation and the provision of employment are significant factors which come about as a result of live music. A 2014 report by UK Music showed the economic value generated by live music in the UK in 2013 was £789 million and provided the equivalent of 21,600 full time jobs.

As the music industry is international by nature, Behr says this complicates the way revenue is allocated, “For instance, if an American artist plays a venue owned by a British company at a gig which is promoted by a company that is part British owned but majority owned by, say, Live Nation (a major international entertainment company) — then the flow of revenues might not be as straightforward as it seems [at] first.”

Despite these complexities, Behr highlighted the broader advantages, “There are, of course, ancillary benefits, especially for big gigs […] Obviously other local businesses like bars, restaurants and carparks benefit from increased trade”, he added.

Behr criticised the idea of making music inaudible and called it “unrealistic”. He said it could limit what kind of music can be played at venues and could force vendors to spend a large amount of money on equipment that enables them to meet noise cancelling requirements. He also mentioned the consequences this has for grassroots music venues as more ‘established’ venues within the city would be the only ones able to afford these changes.

Alongside the inaudibility dispute has been the number of sites that have been closing for the past number of years. According to Dr Behr, this has brought attention to the issue of retaining live music venues in the city and has caused the council to re-evaluate its music strategy and overall cultural policy.

This month, Dr Behr said he is to work on a live music census for Edinburgh’s Council which aims to find out what types of music is played, where, and what exactly it brings to the city. This is in an effort to get the Edinburgh city council to see any opportunities it has with live music and the importance of grassroots venues. The census is similar to one conducted in Victoria, Australia in 2012 on the extent of live music in the state and its economic benefit.

As for the solution to the inaudibility clause, Behr says the initial step is dialogue, and this has already begun. “Having forum discussion, though, is a start — and an improvement”, he said. “There won’t be an overnight solution, but work is ongoing to try to find one that can stick in the long term.”

Beverley Whitrick, Strategic Director of Music Venue Trust, said she is unable to comment on her work with the City of Edinburgh Council or on potential changes to the inaudibility clause in the Licensing Policy. However, she says, “I have been asked to assess the situation and make recommendations in September”.

According to The Scotsman, the Council is working toward helping Edinburgh’s cultural and entertainment scene. Deputy Council Leader Sandy Howat said views of the entertainment industry needs to change and the Council will no longer consider the scene as a “sideline”.

Senior members of the Council, The Scotsman reported, aim to review the planning of the city to make culture more of a priority. Howat said, “If you’re trying to harness a living community and are creating facilities for people living, working and playing then culture should form part of that.”

The review of the inaudibility clause in the Licensing Policy is set to be reviewed near the end of 2016 but the concept of bringing it forward to this year is still under discussion.

Immigration Detainees on Hunger Strike in Oxford UK

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 23-04-2017

Thursday, June 15, 2006

One hundred and twenty detainees at an immigration removal centre in Oxford, UK, are on hunger strike. The protest started when some detainees refused breakfast on Wednesday 14th June 2006. A letter from the hunger strikers explaining why they are seeking to draw attention to their plight in this way has been reproduced in full below.

Those detained at the centre are mostly men who have sought asylum in the UK and whose asylum applications have been rejected. These people are then held without knowing how long they will be detained for – some end up being held for many years while awaiting deportation.

The removal centre, known as Campsfield, or Campsfield House is approximately 5 miles north of Oxford and has been in operation since 1993. It was managed on behalf of the UK Government by Global Solutions Limited, until may 2006 when it was taken on by GEO UK, the centre has a capacity of 198. Only males are detained at Campsfield.

According to the campaign group Barbed Wire Britain Over 2,600 individuals, mostly asylum seekers, are detained indefinitely in the UK without trial and with no automatic right to bail.

There have been reports in the UK press of the state taking people to detention centres without notice, in the early hours of the morning using excessively heavy handed tactics, taking children out of schools and separating families.

Many UK people and politicians express their disgust at the way detainees are treated, yet it continues. Perhaps this action by the detainees themselves will further highlight their plight and result in more UK electors writing to their MPs and demanding improvements to the way in which rejected asylum seekers are treated.

“We are detainees at Campsfield removal centre in Oxford. Most of us have been here for a long while now. There are people who have been detained for up to two years and down to three months. We are cramped in here like animals. We are treated like animals and moved around different detention centres like animals. The immigration service have taken husbands from their families and taken people who ran away from persecution in their various countries, and dumped everyone in here.

Once you are put in here the immigration service forget you. There are detainees who have applied to go back to their own countries that are still being held here for months without any news about their cases, just so that the private security companies get more money.

Detainees are asked to seek asylum and then refused. The immigration service also ask detainees to apply for bail. When you get a bail hearing date all of a sudden they serve you with removal papers that are not valid. There are many of these situations. In most cases the immigration service don’t take you to your court hearings. And then they tell the judges you refused to turn up, just so the hearing goes ahead in your absence. Many detainees have been served with removal papers and travel documents but nothing happens on the removal day.

Campsfield has become a slave house. We detainees are treated like slaves, to do odd jobs for officers. Detainees are handcuffed to see doctors or dentists in hospitals or clinic appointments. We have some racist security officers who make racist comments to detainees and go out of their way to make you feel like committing suicide. Detainees have to be at the point of death before they get to see the doctors.

The food is not worth eating. Even dogs would refuse to eat what we eat. But we don’t have a choice; every single day we eat the same food (the food we eat is rice, chicken, sandwiches, and left-over eggs)”.

Toothpaste fills cavities without drilling

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 23-04-2017

Thursday, February 24, 2005

A paste containing synthetic tooth enamel can seal small cavities without drilling. Kazue Yamagishi and colleagues at the FAP Dental Institute in Tokyo say that the paste can repair small cavities in 15 minutes.

Currently, fillers don’t stick to such small cavities so dentists must drill bigger holes. Hydroxyapatite crystals, of which natural enamel is made, bond with teeth to repair tiny areas of damage.

Yamagishi and colleagues have tested their paste on a lower premolar tooth that showed early signs of decay. They found that the synthetic enamel merged with the natural enamel. The synthetic enamel also appears to make teeth stronger which will improve resistance to future decay. As with drilling, however, there is still the potential for pain: The paste is strongly acidic to encourage crystal growth and causes inflammation if it touches the gums.

The paste is reported in the journal Nature.

Dubai At A Quick Glance Before Your Arrival}

Filed Under (Construction) by on 21-04-2017

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Dubai At A Quick Glance Before Your Arrival

by

Karin Altariq

BurjKhalifa is an architectural construction in the heart of the city of Dubai. It was constructed with an aim to make it the Tallest Skyscraper of the World. It is a 162 storied building. Due to its height, it attracts tourists from everywhere in the world. The idea of the design of this architectural monument has come from the Spider Lily or Hymenocallis, a native desert flower. It has two other names, Living Wonder and Vertical City. It was named after the President of UAE.

The view from a telescope

After climbing to the 124th floor, you will reach the Burj Khalifa observation deck. There are high-speed elevators avail to make your task of climbing easier. It is structured with glass from the ceiling to the floor so that you can get a panoramic view of the whole city of Dubai. There is another observation deck on the 148th floor, which has been recently opened for the tourists.

You can get to see the city through the lenses of a telescope. The glasses contain full HD camera features, high zooming ability and a large screen for monitoring. Different weather conditions at varying seasons give the viewers a unique picturesque. Remember to take your camera or you can ask for the professional photographers over there to do the favor for you.

What to see from the deck

You will be able to see Burj Lake covering over 30-acre of the area, and the beautiful Dubai fountain. It has an intake capacity of 35,000 people at a time. You can walk through the entire floor to get a full frame view of the whole city. Before entering the premises, get your admission tickets. You can buy them beforehand, to avoid standing in long queue. You can purchase a model of BurjKhalifa as a memoir.

The best part of the day to spend in Burj Khalifa is undoubted, the evening time. The sparkling lights of the city and a clear, starry night sky are the most unforgettable moments. One hour is quite sufficient for the Burj Khalifa observation deck, although you can spend unlimited time over there. But it is better to get down when you are finished with experiencing, and moves on to your next destination.

Although you are going through the details before reaching the spot, it is the best to carry a guide personnel to make you understand everything with a personal touch. Also, do visit this place even if you are on a short trip. Be sure to hire someone, who has prior experience of taking tourists to the streets of Dubai. It is safe and tension free to book your trip to a good agency, then you will not have to worry after coming down to the ground floor.

Concluding session

After such a joyful memory, you will feel hungry. So go to the Armani hotels situated near the bottom part of the BurjKhalifa and then return to your hotel. What else can you long for?

For More Detail: http://www.altdubai.com/observation-deck-burj-khalifa.php

It’s always a dream to pay a visit once in life to Dubai which is one of the exciting tourist places. The beautiful sights of this ultimate tourist destination will encourage you to visit this city again and again. Karin Altariq is a good travel and tourist writer and with his writings, she tries to help the tourist for the best and suitable places to visit. Now she is focusing on Dubai and its fabulous beauty.

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com }

Asbestos controversy aboard Scientology ship Freewinds

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 20-04-2017

Friday, May 16, 2008

Controversy has arisen over the reported presence of blue asbestos on the MV Freewinds, a cruise ship owned by the Church of Scientology. According to the Saint Martin newspaper The Daily Herald and the shipping news journal Lloyd’s List, the Freewinds was sealed in April and local public health officials on the Caribbean island of Curaçao where the ship is docked began an investigation into the presence of asbestos dust on the ship. Former Scientologist Lawrence Woodcraft supervised work on the ship in 1987, and attested to the presence of blue asbestos on the Freewinds in an affidavit posted to the Internet in 2001. Woodcraft, a licensed architect by profession, gave a statement to Wikinews and commented on the recent events.

According to The Daily Herald, the Freewinds was in the process of being renovated by the Curaçao Drydock Company. The article states that samples taken from paneling in the ship were sent to the Netherlands, where an analysis revealed that they “contained significant levels of blue asbestos”. An employee of the Curaçao Drydock Company told Radar Online in an April 30 article that the Freewinds has been docked and sealed, and confirmed that an article about asbestos ran in the local paper.

Lloyd’s List reported that work on the interior of the Freewinds was suspended on April 27 after health inspectors found traces of blue asbestos on the ship. According to Lloyd’s List, Frank Esser, Curaçao Drydock Company’s interim director, joined Curaçao’s head of the department of labor affairs Christiene van der Biezen along with the head of the local health department Tico Ras and two inspectors in an April 25 inspection of the ship. “We are sending someone so that they can tell us what happened, where it came from, since when it has been there,” said Panama Maritime Authority’s director of merchant marine Alfonso Castillero in a statement to Lloyd’s List.

The Church of Scientology purchased the ship, then known as the Bohème, in 1987, through an organization called Flag Ship Trust. After being renovated and refitted, it was put into service in June 1988. The ship is used by the Church of Scientology for advanced Scientology training in “Operating Thetan” levels, as well as for spiritual retreats for its members. Curaçao has been the ship’s homeport since it was purchased by the Church of Scientology.

According to his 2001 statement, Lawrence Woodcraft had been an architect in London, England since 1975, and joined Scientology’s elite “Sea Organization” (Sea Org) in 1986. He wrote that he was asked by the Sea Org to work on the Freewinds in 1987, and during his work on the ship “noticed a powdery blue fibrous substance approximately 1 ½” thick between the paint and the steel wall,” which he believed to be asbestos. He also discovered what he thought was blue asbestos in other parts of the ship, and reported his findings to Church of Scientology executives. Woodcraft discussed his experiences in a 2001 interview published online by the Lisa McPherson Trust, a now-defunct organization which was critical of the Church of Scientology.

The Freewinds regularly inspects the air quality on board and always meets or exceeds US standards.

Church of Scientology spokeswoman Karin Pouw responded to Radar Online about the asbestos reports, in an email published in an article in Radar on May 1. “The Freewinds regularly inspects the air quality on board and always meets or exceeds US standards,” said Pouw. She stated that two inspections performed in April “confirmed that the air quality is safe,” and asserted that the inspections revealed the Freewinds satisfies standards set by the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the U.S. Clean Air Act.

Pouw told Radar that “The Freewinds will be completing its refit on schedule.” The Church of Scientology-affiliated organization Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) had been planning a cruise aboard the Freewinds scheduled for May 8, but according to Radar an individual who called the booking number for the cruise received a message that the cruise had been delayed due to ongoing work on the ship. Citing an article in the Netherlands Antilles newspaper Amigoe, Radar reported on May 6 that a team from the United States and supervised by an independent bureau from the Netherlands traveled to Curaçao in order to remove asbestos from the Freewinds.

…if the Church of Scientology claims to have removed the blue asbestos, I just don’t see how, it’s everywhere. You would first have to remove all the pipes, plumbing, a/c ducts, electrical wiring etc. etc. just a maze of stuff.

“I stand by everything I wrote in my 2001 affidavit,” said Lawrence Woodcraft in an exclusive statement given to Wikinews. Woodcraft went on to state: “I would also comment that if the Church of Scientology claims to have removed the blue asbestos, I just don’t see how, it’s everywhere. You would first have to remove all the pipes, plumbing, a/c ducts, electrical wiring etc. etc. just a maze of stuff. Also panelling as well, basically strip the ship back to a steel hull. Also blue asbestos is sprayed onto the outer walls and then covered in paint. It’s in every nook and cranny.”

Many Scientologist celebrities have spent time aboard the Freewinds, including Tom Cruise, Katie Holmes, John Travolta, Kelly Preston, Chick Corea, Lisa Marie Presley, Catherine Bell, Kate Ceberano, and Juliette Lewis. Now magazine reported that Tom Cruise has been urged to seek medical attention regarding potential asbestos exposure, however a representative for Cruise stated he has “absolutely no knowledge” of the recent asbestos controversy. Cruise, Holmes, Travolta and Preston have celebrated birthdays and other events on the Freewinds.

There is not now and never has been a situation of asbestos exposure on the Freewinds.

In a May 15 statement to the United Kingdom daily newspaper Metro, a representative for the Church of Scientology said that “There is not now and never has been a situation of asbestos exposure on the Freewinds.” The Asbestos and Mesothelioma Center notes that agencies have recommended anyone who has spent time on the Freewinds consult with their physician to determine if possible asbestos exposure may have affected their health.

Raw blue asbestos is the most hazardous form of asbestos, and has been banned in the United Kingdom since 1970. Blue asbestos fibers are very narrow and thus easily inhaled, and are a major cause of mesothelioma. Mesothelioma is a form of cancer which can develop in the lining of the lungs and chest cavity, the lining of the abdominal cavity, or the pericardium sac surrounding the heart. The cancer is incurable, and can manifest over 40 years after the initial exposure to asbestos.

“This is the most dangerous type of asbestos because the fibres are smaller than the white asbestos and can penetrate the lung more easily,” said toxicologist Dr. Chris Coggins in a statement published in OK! Magazine. Dr. Coggins went on to note that “Once diagnosed with mesothelioma, the victim has six months to a year to live. It gradually reduces lung function until the victim is no longer able to breathe and dies.”

Anti-Tubby Smith ad rejected by University of Kentucky student paper

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 20-04-2017

Sunday, June 11, 2006

The Kentucky Kernel, the University of Kentucky student newspaper, rejected a full-page ad calling for Tubby Smith’s dismissal as the men’s basketball head coach. Richard Cheeks, a professor at the school, and a group called Concerned Fans for UK Basketball sought the $1,700 ad.

Cheeks said “We see the program in decline. … We don’t want it to decline the way the Louisville program did in the latter years when Denny Crum was there. So we decided that we were going to begin to get our message out.”

A spokesman for Kentucky basketball, Scott Stricklin, said “Being that he’s one of the nation’s winningest coaches, he pretty much knows what it takes to win championships because he’s done it here,” Stricklin said.

The Kentucky Kernel’s general manager, Chris Poore, the decision to reject the ad was without the influence from the University of Kentucky’s administration.

In the past nine seasons at Kentucky, Smith has obtained a 241-71 record, including winning the 1998 national championship.

Cessna to display seven aircraft and new cabin concept at Paris Air Show

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by on 20-04-2017

Wednesday, June 13, 2007

The US-based Cessna Aircraft Company, a subsidiary of Textron Inc., is expected to statically display seven of its aircraft and a mock-up of its latest business jet large cabin concept at the 47th International Paris Air Show, dubbed the LCC.

The seven aircraft expected to be on display are the Citation CJ2+, Citation Encore+, Citation XLS, and Citation Sovereign business jets, a Grand Caravan, a 206 Stationair, and a 172 Skyhawk single engine piston aircraft.

Cessna Chairman, President and CEO Jack Pelton said of the exhibit, “There is so much synergy now with other companies under the Textron corporate banner – companies like Bell Helicopter and Textron Systems – that we felt it made sense for us to return as an exhibitor to the Paris Air Show… We are particularly excited to have our large cabin mockup as the highlight of our exhibit.”

Cessna originally announced plans for a new large model of business jet for the Citation range at last year’s annual National Business Aviation Association meeting, and the idea has been in development since, culminating in the new large cabin concept design. The mock-up at the Paris Air Show includes a large galley, seating for nine passengers, a toilet and a dummy flight deck.

Cessna claim the new design, which outsizes their previous large cabin and long-range business jets, would “set a new standard for performance, cabin comfort, passenger amenities and environmental friendliness,” if launched.

Cessna refuse to release details such as exact internal design specifications and manufacturers of avionics and engines unless the new model actually enters production. Cessna Senior Vice President of Sales & Marketing Roger Whyte told reporters that preliminary wind tunnel testing had “fully met… expectations” and that they had “received extremely positive reaction to the performance parameters as well the cabin design of the proposed aircraft from our customer base”, although he warned that there are still a number of processes to be completed before Cessna actually decide whether or not to launch the new model.

Putting A Motorized Bicycle Kit On Your Bike

Filed Under (Locksmith) by on 19-04-2017

By Dominik Hussl

What are Bicycle Motorized Kits and What are they Used For?

It seems as though the questions about bicycle motorized kits are becoming more and more prevalent as the numbers of people becoming interested in the green movement continues to grow. This is because these motorized kits are quickly developing a solid reputation for being one of the best, innovative ways of taking personal responsibility and contributing in creating a cleaner environment. Bicycle motorized kits are basically what their name implies. They are used to modify a traditional pedal-powered bicycle into a modern motorized bike by simply adding a motor. By purchasing one of these kits one can easily begin down the ecofriendly trail with confidence.

What Do the Bicycle Motorized Kits Come With?

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Many potential consumers are looking for an easy way to modify their traditional bikes by adding a motor to them; however, some are a little confused as far as where to start the process. With many different options available to the consumer today, ordering a motorized bicycle kit is now easier than ever. Most manufacturers of these kits are aware that many of these riders are probably at a novice mechanical level and have provided easy to read and very detailed instructions with each kit. In addition, each kit comes with everything needed to install the motor properly as well as directions for how to perform general maintenance, how to operate the motor properly once installed, and how to troubleshoot common issues.

The types of motors that come with these packages can vary depending upon the type of motor the rider is looking for. The consumer should first do a little homework and determine which motor will be the best fit for his or her bike. For example, two stroke motors are definitely the least complex motor to install and they require the rider to premix a combination of motor oil and gasoline. These are great for the rider that only wants to use their motorized bike on occasion versus for daily transportation needs that have a longer distance. A four stroke engine, on the other hand, offers a much easier style of operation and does not require the mixture of gas and oil. They have a much greater range of power and tend to have a much longer life.

Thus, someone looking to use a motorized bike as his or her sole means of transportation might find this motor more attractive. Finally, the rider has the option of ordering an electric motor, which are quiet during operation and can have significantly more power than the stroke engines. These motors are run with different voltages ranging from 12 to 72 volts.

What Do These Bicycle Motorized Kits Do to Benefit Riders?

There are a multitude of benefits that accompany the use of a motorized bicycle kit. Many have been pleased in knowing they are contributing to a cleaner environment, decreasing our countrys dependence on foreign oil, and saving money on fuel. And, of course they are having fun doing it!

About the Author: For more information on

motorized bicycle kits

as well as

electric bicycless

visit our

motorized bicycle

site

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=561044&ca=Automotive

Rocket Fuel, Now Drugs In Water. Give Me A Break}

Filed Under (Water Filters) by on 16-04-2017

Rocket Fuel, Now Drugs In Water. Give Me A Break

by

David Cassell

Rocket fuel has been found in drinking water and if that wasn’t enough to let your hair fall out, we find out that there are now drugs in water.

Antibiotics, sex hormones, chemotherapy drugs are just a few of the pharmaceuticals that a recent study by the Associated Press found in 24 large metropolitan cities across America. We are talking about 40 million people whose water supplies were affected.

New Issue For The EPA

At this point in time, relying on the EPA to protect you from drugs found in drinking water is perhaps not a good idea. There are just trying to come to grips with the matter themselves.

At an American Chemical Society symposium in September 2000, Christian Daughton, chief of chemistry at U.S. EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory in Las Vegas, said that the whole issue of pharmaceutical drugs in drinking water is a new for the EPA.

And many other experts concur with this opinion saying that no one knows for sure the effects of these drugs on the body or what amounts of it can be considered safe.

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Now in case you are puzzled by the last statement, realize that it is technically and financially impossible for municipal water authorities to remove 100% of every known drinking water contaminant.

Therefore the EPA establishes a maximum contaminant level (MCL), which tells you the maximum amount of a contaminant that is allowed in your water supply without it being considered unsafe. Some contaminants have zero MCL, like lead. It is well known that lead is highly dangerous and no amount is considered safe.

Municipal Water Treatment Not Adequate

The municipal water treatment system is not currently designed to deal with this new threat. As a matter of fact,you might not even be told about the drugs in water.

A Philadelphia Water Department spokeswoman, Laura Copeland told the Associated Press that the department doesn’t want to create any perception where people would be alarmed.

Too Small To Hurt Me?

You might be skeptical and think that the drugs in water are only present in small trace amounts, so it won’t harm you.

But many experts are concerned that as we consume glasses of water over time, the combination of the various biologically active drugs could prove harmful, affecting development, fertility and leading to brain damage in some cases.

Whilst a lot is still unknown, isn’t it better to err on the side of caution and takes steps to protect yourself and family from these harmful pharmaceutical chemicals.

Solution & What To Do Now

When you think that on average, a tenth of the water we consume has been drunk before and that there is no new water because our planet constantly recycles it, then you realize how precious a commodity water is. You can’t afford to have your family consume tap water that has drugs in it.

To protect them and yourself, acquire a quality home water filter system. These are capable of removing pharmaceutical drugs in water conveniently and economically.

There are many such devices on the market so do your due diligence and only buy water filtration units that have been certified.

And if all this seems confusing, seek out websites that analyze the pros and cons of the varying filtration technologies. These websites will certainly offer you information that will help you make an informed buying decision.

If you want to drink the cleanest and purest water, you need a

home water treatment system

now. We research these devices and tell you which are most effective in achieving safe drinking water for your family. All this and more at

best-water-filter-guide.com

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com

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